Participation

Assessment of participation data examines who is using career development programs and services, often describing users within demographic categories (e.g., age, gender, race, ethnicity, class standing). This helps determine who is using services and, just as importantly, who is not being served. Here are some examples of how participation data has informed practice at our career center:

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Surveys

For many people, when they think assessment, they think survey. Surveys can be great tools for efficiently collecting data from large groups of people. Surveys can also be poorly constructed, over used, and suffer from low response rates. We encourage our staff to use this method thoughtfully. First consider carefully what outcomes you want to measure. Do those lend themselves to a survey? If so, what is your environment like? Is an online or paper survey best? What question formats would be most appropriate. See our reference list at the bottom of this page for some good resources on survey design. In the meantime, here are some sample surveys that have been well-implemented by our career professionals:

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Rubrics

A rubric is a tool to help evaluate the quality of a work sample by a specified set of criteria. It can be challenging to build a rubric that has clear and distinct categories that can be consistently applied across multiple raters. When developing rubrics, we begin with examples from reputable professionals, and draw in comparisons to theory and our own teaching materials. Here are some sample rubrics that our office has worked with:

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Brief Reflections

Brief reflections are thought-provoking questions that ask students to provide responses that indicate their knowledge, attitudes, or values, often indicating how these may have changed or expanded as a result of participation in a career development program or service. They are a short snapshot of a moment in time which provide insight into the perceived value of a learning experience. While brief reflections require very little time investment from students, they can provide very useful insights to career professionals. Here are some examples of brief reflection uses from The Career Center:

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